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the u.s. may be violating international law through its use of nsa surveillance programs. she spoke as a representative of a group that has formulated new principles aimed at protecting people from unwarranted electronic surveillance. speaking at part of an event, this is 40 minutes. >> excuse me, hello. if even could come to the forward of the room, please, you can bring your food, your drinks. leads sit down, we're going to -- please sit down, we're going to get started. [inaudible conversations] like herding cats. so i wanted to welcome everyone to the new america foundation. i'm thomas gideon, i'm the director of technology at the open technology institute. oti, as some of you may know, is an operational think tank that brings many disciplines together to collaborate on improving access to and control of open technologies. in supporting one of those disciplines, the one directly tasked with the research and development of open technologies such as the commercial wireless project, i especially appreciate the purpose of this event and this event series, this wider multicity, multi
the nsa a is not operating these microphones clearly. [laughter] or maybe barack obama is. that's a good point. it's wonderful to be here tonight. wonderful to be here at the steam boat institute. i think it's long past time that the aspen institute got a doze of truth and reality and facts. [applause] and we're thrilled to be part of that effort here tonight. we thought we would do a cup of things. we want to talk about current events, but the most important current event in our lives in our family has been the fact that my dad was bless -- we were all blessed. my dad was a recipient a of new heart a little over a year ago. [applause] and his story, you know, he talked about his first campaign for office when he was elected, and 1967, when i was running the first time was also the first time he had a heart attack, and i've been going back for reasons you can imagine looking at some old news clippings about political campaigns in wyoming, and came across one where my dad was asked about his heart attack in 1978. after he had the attack and decided he was going stay in the race he was int
an amendment that would bar the nsa from using funds to collect phone and data records from citizens not subject to an investigation. the amendment which was opposed by house leader john boehner in the white house was defeated by a vote of 205-217. this town hall held in marshall michigan is just over an hour. [applause] >> hello everyone. he is my chief of staff. he doesn't just work for me so if you have questions or concerns here in the district you can always reach ben. he is primarily in my grand rapids office my main district office. you can find that on my web site. we have a satellite office in battle creek so if there is something you would like to schedule or an appointment you would like to schedule contact her grand rapids office so we can make sure we have someone down here to meet with u.s. well in calhoun county. by district director is not here today but he is also a valuable resource. if you want to contact my grand rapids office to reach him please feel free to do so. he is always around except for today but for a good cause he is not here today. but, he is a great
of tennessee. she's also chair of the judicial conference of the nsa's committee on the budget, and so is well and deeply first and funding issues faced by the court and can answer i believe many of the implicit questions raised in the opening statement from both myself and senator sessions. judge gibbons, please proceed. >> chairman coons, senator sessions, members of the subcommittee, i appear before you as chair of the judicial conference committee on the budget. the judiciary very much appreciates the invitation to discuss the financial crisis facing the courts. senator coons, i am pleased that judge is a known circuit are here today. i see judge ted mickey. there's the judge from your home state. the third circuit itself -- as rest of the judiciary but it's within the circuit coordination and efforts to address the current crisis has been stellar. i also would like to recognize judge john bates right here behind me, the new director of the administrative office of the court who comes after serving on the d.c. federal district court. the $350 million, 5% across the board sequestration cuts
the ramification of the nsa/prism issue as that continues to be a topic of concern in europe. russia will clearly be a topic ask be, of course, syria, egypt, the middle east and the unrest there. so i believe you'll see a very fulsome bilateral conversation within the nordic state, and i think it's an excellent preparation to get the president ready as he travels to st. petersburg to meet with his g8 -- g20, excuse me, colleagues. and, matt, i'll let you take the baton. >> let me introduce matt really quickly. matt goodman holds our william simon chair in political economy. the sigh hon chair examines current issues this international economic policy with a lahr focus on the asia pacific. but i should also say that matt previously served as the white house coordinator for the east asia summit, for the asia-pacific summit many, but he also served as director on the nsc staff and was responsible for the g20, g8 and other international forums. and with that, i'd like to introduce my colleague, matt goodman. >> thank you, ann i drew. hank, heather. so the president will be participating in the eighth
the relationship, especially in light of what has happened with edward snowden and the nsa that relationship between the foreign spacing components of the american government, and its relationship to owners and operators of critical infrastructure who traditionally operate domestically. >> there are a few trend that are important, underpinnings of your question. first of all, over the last decade, increasingly the department of defense relies on facilities here in the united states in order to operate our forces abroad, and so when you look at the dependence of dod facilities, military bases here, on privately owned infrastructure, especially the electric grid, you can see the imperative for dod to be able to partner effectively, not only with industry to assure the flow of those vital electricity services, but of course also with the department of energy and the department of homeland security, which will always be in the lead for the federal government. never the department of defense force these kinds of issues. so, building industry collaboration under the leadership and the federal team
at the fisa debate. a lot of people looked at other stories we wrote about fisa, and about nsa spying and that sort of thing. it put a human face, i think, on the otherwise inpenetrable government bureaucracy system going on. nobody ever really stands exactly -- don't understand what is going on when nsa decides to tap someone's phone. and it was a nice way to sort of show that to people. >> i agree with john when he mentioned that people seem to be more plugged in to politics now than they have ever been. there are part of the explosion of media outlet on capitol hill covering politics since 2006, 2007.ort what you see is that people are only going places that reenforce their already-held opinions. so it's important -- we all -- all of our organizations do really well, is to provide an independent viewpoint or independent look at what is going on in in washington that is simplified enough for the common person, the nonpolitical person to understand but nuanced enough that, you know, you're not boiling it down to something where they're not getting anything out of it. like, i was talk
of the recent nsa disclosures that we're learning about is, you know, if you don't have members of congress and the u.s., the american people knowing about what the government is doing and the kind of extraordinary power they want to make the country safe, then, you know, you do risk the sense this will just be the kind of permanent war that will never end, and you will never be able to grapple, and that creates a national security bureaucracy. but that said, the idea that you just want to -- you know, if you were to say that we should repeal that aumf, then you would effectively be saying you don't think there currently is a war, and as tom said, the enemy gets a vote, and they're still at war with us. that's kind of where i'm at. >> let me just throw into the discussion, i'm pretty sure president obama suggested before the closing of the diplomatic outposts that the authorization for the use of military force, that congress should consider repealing it. but again, that -- >> or modifying it. >> or modifying it. very different, i guess. the idea of repealing it would be based on the narrat
on the climate. >> host: what about the nsa issue that nfacing? >> guest: it's an interesting issue that concerns me but interesting that when i'm home i don't hear it much. i hear it from a small group of people but when i'm at the coffee shop that one doesn't come up. the irs one comes up a lot of though. >> host: jake in massachusetts on the independent line the republican of nebraska is the guest. >> caller: people think they need to make a lot more money than they should. in that case they should get a good tax credit to the people working good full-time jobs but not making a bunch of money. so, people would want to get a part-time job but not such a great job. it would put more money in their pockets at. and i notice when people get their tax returns and what not, they put all that money back and buy a new tv or read a4a pity the the what help the economy. it's just i talk to people and they think they should be making 20 or $30 an hour because they think they deserve that. but really what i think is if they give a good tax break to the part-time and the people who may be are making the $40
-span.org. he was also asked about the nsa surveillance program. >> each night this weekend c-span2, while congress is on break, we're showing on four presentations of q&a. today, nobel peace prize winner jody williams. she won the prize in 1997 for her efforts towards a worldwide ban on landmines. then at 8 p.m. eastern booktv prime time. tonight, the focus is on what booktv viewers are reading this summer. >> over this congressional recess, the service employees international union is lobbying to convince congress to pass immigration reform. this morning from washington to talk with one of the union's leaders about why they're doing that. this is about half an hour. >> host: our focus is immigration and our guest is eliseo medina who is the secretary-treasurer of the service employees international union. thanks so much for being with us. >> guest: thank you so much for having me. >> host: as a look at the debate over immigration and it is front and center in the august recess as members of congress traveled to the respective states and congressional districts, what do you think the immi
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10